Tapari

TapariLong before the invention of plastic spoons and paper plates, Nepalis were using their own natural form of disposable tableware – tapari. Made from leaves of the Sal plant, or Shorea robusta, tapari are now used to serve food not only during traditional marriage parties and religious ceremonies, but even by urban fast food stalls.

Tapari are produced mostly in Nepal’s hilly regions, as Sal leaves grow wild in tropical and sub-tropical forests across the country. The leaves are gathered by tapari producers, stitched together with bamboo and moulded and cut to various sized plates and bowls.

Because the raw materials needed for tapari don’t need to be cultivated, tapari production provides good business and employment opportunities for landless and marginalised people and small scale farmers. However, because tapari is produced in hilly regions, transporting and marketing it can be difficult for the producers. MEDEP has been working to support tapari production enterprises in Udayapur district by providing entrepreneurship and skills training, contributing to the purchase of moulding and cutting machinery, and building market linkages with urban retailers. MEDEP also promotes a community forest approach to tapari production to protect the sustainability of the natural resource and is currently seeking forestry certification for entrepreneurs’ products.

Tapari in a range of sizes and shapes is available in both wholesale and retail quantities from Saugaat Griha, the sales outlet of micro, cottage and small entrepreneurs’ products at Tripureshowar, Kathmandu.

For more details please contact:
National Micro Entrepreneurs Groups Association
Saugaat Griha
Tripureshowar (next to Department of Industry)
Tel: +977 (0) 16215404
Email: nmega.nepal@gmail.com

 

Long before the invention of plastic spoons and paper plates, Nepalis were using their own natural form of disposable tableware – tapari. Made from leaves of the Sal plant, or Shorea robusta, tapari are now used to serve food not only during traditional wedding parties and religious ceremonies, but even by urban fast food stalls.

 Tapari are produced mostly in Nepal’s hilly regions, as Sal leaves grow wild in tropical and sub-tropical forests across the country. The leaves are gathered by tapari producers, stitched together with bamboo fine sticks and moulded and cut to various sized plates and bowls.

 Because the raw materials needed for Tapari don’t need to be cultivated, Tapari production provides good business and employment opportunities for landless and marginalised people and small scale farmers. However, because Tapari is produced in hilly regions, transporting and marketing it can be difficult for the producers. 

MEDEP has been working to support Tapari production enterprises in Udayapur district by providing entrepreneurship and skills training, contributing to the purchase of moulding and cutting machinery, and building market linkages with urban retailers.

MEDEP also promotes a community forest approach to Tapari production to protect the sustainability of the natural resource and is currently seeking forestry certification for entrepreneurs’ products.

 Tapari in a range of sizes and shapes is available in both wholesale and retail quantities from Saugaat Griha, the sales outlet of micro, cottage and small entrepreneurs’ products at Tripureshwar, Kathmandu.

 




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